Tenant Screening: Roommate Addition

When you choose a tenant for your rental property, you do so by conducting tenant screening. With tenant screening, you are acquiring information regarding the tenant, including completing a background check.

  • Monday, March 26, 2018

  General   Tenant Screening   

When you choose a tenant for your rental property, you do so by conducting tenant screening. With tenant screening, you are acquiring information regarding the tenant, including completing a background check. Once you have received the information and decide the individual is great for your property, a lease is signed. For some tenants, they end up requiring a roommate over time, due to job issues or other income needs. What does this mean for you, the property owner? Having a roommate clause in place will ensure that your property is not inhabited by anyone that you are unaware of.

Roommate Clause

It is not uncommon for a tenant to take on a roommate. When renters have a two bedroom or larger space, they can easily make room for friends or family. But what does this mean for you? A new tenant in your property could potentially cause issues or create a problem with rent payments. It is important to add a roommate clause to your tenant agreement, so you are made aware of any individual that could potentially be a roommate to your current tenant.

To begin, you need to decide what you wish to require. You can add a clause to your tenancy agreement that requires an addition of a roommate to go through you first. This way, you can screen the new individual that will be living in your property. You want to be sure this individual is as responsible as your current tenant and will not be a problem in the future.

Current tenants should be willing to complete this process for you. If not, then you should raise questions as to why they are not willing to have their potential roommate go through the screening process. Discuss the roommate clause with your tenant when signing a lease agreement so they fully understand what you expect if they are to consider a roommate in the future.

Check in with tenants from time to time to ensure that roommates are not present. It is not uncommon for individuals to stay overnight, but you do not want someone moving into the residence without your approval.

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