Tenant 101: How to Handle a Rent Increase

As a tenant, you expect certain requirements when applying to rent an apartment or residential dwelling. These requirements can include a background check, providing personal information, references, etc. One aspect to consider when renting a property is a rent increase

  • Wednesday, April 18, 2018

  Rents & Deposits   Tips   

As a tenant, you expect certain requirements when applying to rent an apartment or residential dwelling. These requirements can include a background check, providing personal information, references, etc. The landlord will look at this information and determine if you are a fit for their property. One aspect to consider when renting a property is a rent increase. Over time, the landlord may decide to increase your rent based on environmental factors, such as the area becoming more sought after. Whatever the case may be, it is important to understand how to handle the situation.

Receiving a Notice of Rent Increase

By law, your landlord must provide you with a notice that the rent will be increasing. Time should be provided to allow you to look for another apartment or accept the increase. If your landlord decides to increase your rent without notification, then you may have the right to legal action. The course of action you take will be determined by the local laws of your region.

Once you receive this notice, look it over and see if you feel the increase is fair. If the increase breaks any terms of your rental agreement, discuss these terms with your landlord. You can also choose to discuss the change with your landlord and see if they might reconsider. The landlord does have the right to increase the rent, but if you plan on leaving and they value you as a tenant, they may reconsider.

It never hurts to ask for the rent to stay the same or to see a slightly less increase than what is being suggested. If the amount is too high for you to afford, talk to your landlord. Discuss how this will be difficult for you and how you wish to stay. The landlord may be willing to work something out with you.

As the tenant, it is important to handle the rent increase with tact. Be respectful of your landlord and have an open dialog about how you feel about the increase. if they respect and value your tenancy, they will be willing to work with you on the rental increase.

DISCLAIMER:

VerticalRent® is not a law firm, and the employees of VerticalRent® are not acting as your attorney. Our educational blog or landlord forms engine is not a substitute for the sound advice of a local attorney, whom is familiar with your local laws and regulations. VerticalRent® cannot provide you with legal advice, nor are we permitted to engage in the practice of law.

We are prohibited from providing you with any sort of advice, opinion, explanation, or recommendation about your possible legal rights – which may include remedies, options, defenses, or the selection of landlord forms available on the VerticalRent platform. Our platform is designed to provide landlords and property managers with powerful online tools to screen applicants, collect rent online, advertise vacancies, and generate free landlord forms. To that extent, our blog often publishes general information on issues commonly encountered by landlords – such as evicting tenants.

Although VerticalRent takes every reasonable effort possible to ensure the accuracy of its consumer reports and landlord forms, we do not guarantee or warrant the information to be correct, complete, or up-to-date. The law changes rapidly across the United States, from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. We will not be held responsible for any loss, injury, claim, damage, or liability related to the use of our blog, landlord forms or consumer reports generated from this platform.



comments powered by Disqus
Get Started For Free!     Have some questions? Check out our FAQs.