Important Guidelines for Letting Tenants Paint Your Rental Property

Usually, the standard practice is for landlords to paint their rental properties in neutral colors with the expectation that tenants will personalize the space with their choices of furnishings and accessories.

  • Thursday, October 20, 2016

  General   Tips   

Usually, the standard practice is for landlords to paint their rental properties in neutral colors with the expectation that tenants will personalize the space with their choices of furnishings and accessories. Keeping the paint colors neutral also makes it easier and more cost-effective when it's time to repaint. However, if you decide to make provision for your tenants to paint, consider these guidelines for letting tenants paint your rental property.

Obtain Your Permission

Tenants should have your permission in writing to repaint the rental space if this issue is not already covered by the lease. This agreement spells out the specific stipulations for painting the rental property and will be signed by both parties.

  1. The landlord has final approval over the paint color scheme.
  2. Do not paint woodwork and trim.
  3. Repaint the unit to the original paint color at the end of the lease or when the unit becomes vacant.

Deposit

The average renter is not a professional at painting. Make sure that a deposit is charged to cover the cost of correcting a poor quality paint job that results in damages to the carpet or wood trim. Refer to your local laws to determine if that fee is recoverable from the security deposit or if you can charge a nonrefundable fee. The deposit is forfeited if the tenant does not abide by the terms of the agreement.

By incorporating these guidelines, the renter can make an informed decision by knowing what the expectations are and the consequences for violating the provisions of the agreement. If they choose to proceed with changing the paint color, the landlord has taken steps to avoid unnecessary expenses and maintain the aesthetics of the property.

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