How to Evict a Tenant in North Dakota

Eviction proceedings are an unpleasant but necessary part of being a landlord. Even if your tenant has not paid rent or otherwise violated their lease, it is important to follow the proper channels.

  • Saturday, March 25, 2017

  General   Legal   North Dakota   Eviction Guide   

Eviction proceedings are an unpleasant but necessary part of being a landlord. Even if your tenant has not paid rent or otherwise violated their lease, it is important to follow the proper channels to ensure you are able to secure a successful eviction in the state of North Dakota.

How do I begin eviction proceedings?

Three days after non-payment of rent or immediately following the discovery of a material lease violation, a landlord may issue a Notice to Quit. This provides the tenant with three days in order to vacate the property before the eviction proceedings may begin. It is important to note that you are not required to accept payment of rent or any remedy of the lease violation at this time.

In order to be considered valid, a notice to quit must be filed by a process-server, sheriff, or by placing the notice in a conspicuous place on the property such as the front door. In North Dakota, if the notice will be delivered in person, this should occur between the hours of 6am and 10pm.

What are the next steps?

If the tenant has not vacated the property within the three-day time-period, the landlord may move forward with the eviction proceedings by filing a complaint in the district court where the property is located. The landlord must ensure that the tenant receives a copy of the filing.

If you are successful in receiving a judgment for the eviction, the tenant will be given a certain amount of time to leave. If the tenant remains on the property, the local sheriff can assist with the eviction.

Keep reading us at VerticalRent as we explore all U.S. eviction laws.

DISCLAIMER:

VerticalRent® is not a law firm, and the employees of VerticalRent® are not acting as your attorney.Our free eviction notice service is not a substitute for the sound advice of a local attorney, whom is familiar with your local laws and regulations.VerticalRent® cannot provide you with legal advice, nor are we permitted to engage in the practice of law.Therefore, we are prohibited from providing you with any sort of advice, opinion, explanation, or recommendation about your possible legal rights – which may include remedies, options, defenses, or the selection of landlord forms available on the VerticalRent platform.

Our platform is designed to provide landlords and property managers with an education portal to share ideas, connect with one another, screen applicants, collect rent online, advertise vacancies, and generate free landlord forms.To that extent, our blog and community often publishes general information on legal issues commonly encountered by landlords – such as evicting tenants.

Although VerticalRent takes every reasonably effort possible to ensure the accuracy of its consumer reports and landlord forms, we do not guarantee or warrant the information to be correct, complete, or up - to - date.The law changes rapidly in across the United States, from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

Finally, it should be noted that VerticalRent is not responsible for any loss, injury, claim, damage, or liability related to the use of our landlord forms or consumer reports generated from this platform.


comments powered by Disqus
Get Started For Free!     Have some questions? Check out our FAQs.