Evicting a Tenant in Wyoming: A Quick Guide for Landlords Dealing With Problem Tenants

If you've expanded your rental investments into the great state of Wyoming, you may expect most of your renters to live up to your agreement. As maybe a first-time real estate investor, you should know you're likely to encounter at least one bad tenant in your career.

  • Monday, March 27, 2017

  General   Legal   Wyoming   Eviction Guide   

If you've expanded your rental investments into the great state of Wyoming, you may expect most of your renters to live up to your agreement. As maybe a first-time real estate investor, you should know you're likely to encounter at least one bad tenant in your career. Perhaps you're experiencing one now who isn't paying their rent, or just paying late.

Wyoming has similar eviction laws to others in the U.S. Even so, you have to stay within certain guidelines, including sending notices before any evictions can occur. Here's another quick guide for landlords on dealing with evictions in Wyoming, and basic time frames.

What Can You Do If Someone Doesn't Pay Rent On Time?

It's always smart to have an applicant fill out a rental application and then work out a formal lease agreement with the tenant beforehand so you have no disputes. Getting this in writing makes it official rather than just a verbal agreement. Even with this, a tenant maybe isn't paying rent on the due date you agreed to. You're allowed to add a late fee if they pay late, though you're also legally able to send a Notice to Quit.

When you send this notice, Wyoming law lets you request rent payment within three days, or pursue eviction. Keep in mind you give freedom to the tenant to move out within these three days. You can use the tenant's security deposit to cover the rent they didn't pay. Or, you may have to sue later to get the full amount.

Making Your Notice to Quit Visible

Typically, you'll have to leave the Notice to Quit on the tenant's door if you can't give it to them in person. Even mailing it is satisfactory. Before you send the notice, it's a good idea to use a professional template. This assures you use the right legal language and tackle all points on why you're sending the notice.

Always remember that if the tenant pays the rent within three days, you can't proceed with an eviction in court.

Filing a Complaint for Eviction

When the tenant does nothing after you send the notice, you now have a right to seek an eviction in your district circuit court. The court sends a copy of your complaint and a summons to the tenant. They have to attend your hearing so the judge hears both sides of the story. In any case where you changed locks or turned off their utilities, you'll lose your case. However, if the tenant doesn't attend the hearing, you can automatically go forth with the eviction process, or the writ of restitution.

Keep reading us at VerticalRent as we explore all U.S. eviction laws.

DISCLAIMER:

VerticalRent® is not a law firm, and the employees of VerticalRent® are not acting as your attorney.Our free eviction notice service is not a substitute for the sound advice of a local attorney, whom is familiar with your local laws and regulations.VerticalRent® cannot provide you with legal advice, nor are we permitted to engage in the practice of law.Therefore, we are prohibited from providing you with any sort of advice, opinion, explanation, or recommendation about your possible legal rights – which may include remedies, options, defenses, or the selection of landlord forms available on the VerticalRent platform.

Our platform is designed to provide landlords and property managers with an education portal to share ideas, connect with one another, screen applicants, collect rent online, advertise vacancies, and generate free landlord forms.To that extent, our blog and community often publishes general information on legal issues commonly encountered by landlords – such as evicting tenants.

Although VerticalRent takes every reasonably effort possible to ensure the accuracy of its consumer reports and landlord forms, we do not guarantee or warrant the information to be correct, complete, or up - to - date.The law changes rapidly in across the United States, from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

Finally, it should be noted that VerticalRent is not responsible for any loss, injury, claim, damage, or liability related to the use of our landlord forms or consumer reports generated from this platform.


comments powered by Disqus
Get Started For Free!     Have some questions? Check out our FAQs.