Evicting a Tenant in Michigan - Guidelines to Follow

The grounds for eviction of tenants remain the same in many states, however, in Michigan, owners are not allowed to evict tenants without a court order, irrespective of the reasons, apart from a tenant who got into the property illegally.

  • Sunday, December 18, 2016

  General   Legal   Michigan   Eviction Guide   

The grounds for eviction of tenants remain the same in many states (e.g., failure to pay rent, particular property vandalism, illegal conduct in the premises, or termination of the leasing contract between the landlord and the tenant). In Michigan, owners are not allowed to evict tenants without a court order, irrespective of the reasons, apart from a tenant who got into the property illegally.

In instances where the tenant gets evicted without prior court intervention, they can sue the landlord for damages and the court would favor the tenant. To avoid such lawsuits by tenants, the following steps provide the guidelines a landlord should follow in the eviction process in Michigan.

Serving tenant with an eviction notice

The most important step is to issue a legal notice of eviction to the tenant specifying what you expect of them including the reasons for the order and the deadline by which you want them to vacate your property. The notice lets the tenant know that they need to move and look for somewhere else to live. It serves as evidence that the landlord gave enough time to the tenant to plan themselves or to make amends in the case of a notice because of nonpayment, or due to violation of lease agreements.

Filling and serving the summons and eviction complaints

If the tenant still refuses to move after the time stipulated on the notice expires, the landlord needs to take a court action to start a legal proceeding to force the tenant out. The action enables the landlord to obtain a court hearing day after filing the lawsuit.

The verdict

The landlord and tenant must attend the hearing to hear what the court has to say about the matter. If the court rules in favor of the landlord, then the tenant vacates the premises and pays any due rent.

Keep reading us at VerticalRent as we explore all U.S. eviction laws.

DISCLAIMER:

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