Evicting a Tenant in DC: A Small Landlord's Quick Guide to the Facts

When it comes to eviction laws nationwide, you'll frequently see small differences among most states. Throughout most of the country, you'll see a steady law pattern of eviction notices coming first, followed by court orders for full eviction.

  • Monday, May 15, 2017

  General   Legal   District of Columbia   Eviction Guide   

When it comes to eviction laws nationwide, you'll frequently see small differences among most states. Throughout most of the country, you'll see a steady law pattern of eviction notices coming first, followed by court orders for full eviction.

As a landlord in the Washington, D.C. area, you may have a lot of problematic tenants you need to deal with soon. Rather than taking action on your own (which you can't do legally in D.C.), you'll want a good primer on what's possible.

The Difference in Notices to Pay

In some states, you can send three-day or even six-day payment notices to your tenants if they've reneged on paying rent. You can only do a 30-day notice in D.C. on rent payment notices and vacating the property.

Obviously, this gives far more time for tenants to pay you rent than in many other states. Keep in mind the 30 days should include weekends or holidays.

To make the notice legal, you need to include a number of typical things: date of notice, names and addresses of tenants, reason for the notice, and total amount rent due. You also need to specify the exact date within 30 days that you expect the rent paid.

Who Should You Give the Notice To?

Perhaps you can't find the tenant to give them the notice personally. D.C. law permits you to present the notice to someone in the household who's at least 16 years old. Even if you can't find anyone to give it to, you can simply post it on the door of the tenant's dwelling. You'll have to mail a copy within at least three days after posting on the door.

Reasons Behind Your Eviction

It's not legally possible to evict simply because you don't like someone. Here's just a few legal reasons to evict: Not paying rent, violation of tenancy, illegal acts, or wishing to demolish the rental unit. Other reasons include selling the property to someone else in good faith, rehabilitation of the rental unit, or conversion to a condominium.

The Eviction Process

Take some time to read up on D.C.'s Superior Court laws when filing for an eviction. When you file, the judge makes the final decision and orders a writ of eviction in your favor. They hold a hearing first to hear your side and the tenant's side. A U.S. Marshal then gains authority to officially remove tenants off your property.

If you or your tenants need legal help, you can get it through D.C.'s Legal Aid Society. Before renting to a tenant, it is always smart to run an eviction report with VerticalRent. As part of VerticalRent’s background check, you can order both a criminal and eviction report. Every eviction report also includes SSN verification, the issuing state, and the issuing year.

Keep reading us at VerticalRent as we explore all U.S. eviction laws.

DISCLAIMER:

VerticalRent® is not a law firm, and the employees of VerticalRent® are not acting as your attorney.Our free eviction notice service is not a substitute for the sound advice of a local attorney, whom is familiar with your local laws and regulations.VerticalRent® cannot provide you with legal advice, nor are we permitted to engage in the practice of law.Therefore, we are prohibited from providing you with any sort of advice, opinion, explanation, or recommendation about your possible legal rights – which may include remedies, options, defenses, or the selection of landlord forms available on the VerticalRent platform.

Our platform is designed to provide landlords and property managers with an education portal to share ideas, connect with one another, screen applicants, collect rent online, advertise vacancies, and generate free landlord forms.To that extent, our blog and community often publishes general information on legal issues commonly encountered by landlords – such as evicting tenants.

Although VerticalRent takes every reasonably effort possible to ensure the accuracy of its consumer reports and landlord forms, we do not guarantee or warrant the information to be correct, complete, or up - to - date.The law changes rapidly in across the United States, from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

Finally, it should be noted that VerticalRent is not responsible for any loss, injury, claim, damage, or liability related to the use of our landlord forms or consumer reports generated from this platform.


comments powered by Disqus
Get Started For Free!     Have some questions? Check out our FAQs.